Motivations for Discipleship

White Arrow On Blue Ground

This blog post was adapted from a sermon that I gave at the Harvard Avenue Student Ministry‘s Disciple Now event on Friday, October 25, 2013.

Key Text: Colossians 3:1-13

Each follower of Christ, no matter how young or old, needs to take up his cross daily and pursue Jesus. Most Christians know that they need discipleship, but how do we get motivated to be and make disciples?

Apathy is a growing problem in America. The combination of economic and societal changes with an increased “busyness” has left many without the drive necessary to pursue bigger and better things. In 2011, the motivational market hit $11 billion in revenue. The average motivational speaker gets paid $4000-5000 per speaking event, with some commanding fees in excess of $100,000 per engagement.

Christians aren’t immune to apathy. In fact, one of the largest problems in the church today is biblical illiteracy stemming from believers not reading Scripture for themselves. Even fewer share the gospel or form discipleship relationships with other believers.

Motivations for Discipleship

To overcome this tendency towards apathy, here are 6 motivations for discipleship from Colossians 3:1-13:  Read more of this post

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5 Reasons to Study Scripture

This blog post was adapted from a Sunday School lesson that I prepared for the Harvard Avenue College/Career Ministry on Sunday, August 25, 2013 to begin a semester-long study entitled “Scripture: Unchanging Truth in a Changing World.” If you’re a young adult in the Siloam Springs area, join us Sunday mornings at 9:15a as we continue this study.

Key Text: 2 Timothy 3:12-17

Paul knew the persecutions that would be faced by those who lived a godly life in a godless culture. By the time he is writing to Timothy, he has been stoned, shipwrecked, snakebitten, jailed, beaten, left for dead, spat upon, cursed, jailed again, and condemned to die. Though our society isn’t as hostile to Christianity as Paul’s was, we will still face degrees of persecution as believers. Paul recognized that there was one thing that had helped him face his persecutions and would help Timothy face his: Scripture: the only unchanging truth in a changing world.  Read more of this post

Disciplined Disciples, Part 2

Bible Study 2

This blog post was adapted from a sermon that I gave at the Harvard Avenue Student Ministry youth group on Wednesday, January 9, 2013, as well as two talks Donald Whitney gave on Spiritual Disciplines at First Baptist Church in Fort Smith on February 8, 2013. 

Key Text: 1 Timothy 4:6-16

In Disciplined Disciples, Part 1, I made the case that all Christians have been called by Jesus to be and make disciples. If any person chooses to follow Christ, they must be ready to seek him through spiritual disciplines. In fact, we have redeemed so that we can pursue holiness. Using a story of my brother and I, I showed how holiness gives direction to our daily practice of spiritual disciplines.

What are spiritual disciplines? Spiritual disciplines are those personal and corporate activities that promote spiritual growth. In other words, spiritual disciplines are like spiritual exercises. They are ways we can place ourselves in the path of God’s grace so that, over time, He can transform us “from one degree of glory to another” (2 Corinthians 3:18). While not every spiritual discipline is practiced on a daily basis, there are two that should be done every day: Bible intake and prayer.  Read more of this post

Worship: The Joyful Feast of God’s Glory

Bubble Gum

This blog post was adapted from a sermon that I gave at Crossroads Fellowship on Sunday, June 24, 2012. To read some of my other sermons, click here.

Do you chew gum? Have you ever thought about why we even have gum? Gum has been around in some form or another for thousands of years going back as far as Ancient Greece. But when you think about it, it really has no purpose: it isn’t able to fill you up, it’s flavor only lasts for a limited amount of time, it eventually makes your jaw sore, and worst of all, it gets stuck on the bottom of our shoes. So why do we still have gum? For many it is because of the short-term enjoyment it brings.

Luckily, most people realize that we can’t survive just by chewing gum. Our physical bodies need real food and water to function. Food sustains us, brings us satisfaction, and enables us to continue with our lives. But what about our spiritual sustenance? Where does it come from?  Read more of this post

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