The Illusion of Busyness

Honey Bee Swarm

Americans are busy.

Or at least they like to say that they are.

As an entrepreneur and college ministry director, I’m around a lot of “busy” people. While some people are legitimately busy, many people are operating under an illusion of busyness. We think we are a lot busier than we really are. Rather than focus on one assignment at a time in order to systematically knock them out, we try to multitask instead which often obliterates our productivity. Due to poor time management skills (and the constant temptation offered by email, social media, and cell phones), tasks that should take one hour to complete consume two, three, even four hours instead. Add to this the way our culture subconsciously equates a person’s “busyness level” with his/her value and success, and it’s no wonder people talk/brag/complain about how busy they are all the time

How can we shatter this illusion of busyness? Here are three pointers:  Read more of this post

Maximizing Your “Return on Time”

 Ready steady... Go  - Day 86 of Project 365

Time is the most precious resource available. It is not renewable, transferable, or savable.  The time you spend reading this blog post isn’t refundable. Following the basic economic principles of supply and demand, since time is such a limited resource, it is extremely valuable.

Just like an investor examines the return on investment for different financial options (stocks, bonds, real estate, startup companies), you and I must evaluate the “return on time” for the activities in our lives. However, there is one big difference between money and time. As one person put it, “Money, I can only gain or lose. But time I can only lose. So, I must spend it carefully.” If we are a good steward of our time, then we will invest it in the activities that we deem to have the highest potential return on time.  That’s where priorities come in.  Read more of this post

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