The Illusion of Busyness

Honey Bee Swarm

Americans are busy.

Or at least they like to say that they are.

As an entrepreneur and college ministry director, I’m around a lot of “busy” people. While some people are legitimately busy, many people are operating under an illusion of busyness. We think we are a lot busier than we really are. Rather than focus on one assignment at a time in order to systematically knock them out, we try to multitask instead which often obliterates our productivity. Due to poor time management skills (and the constant temptation offered by email, social media, and cell phones), tasks that should take one hour to complete consume two, three, even four hours instead. Add to this the way our culture subconsciously equates a person’s “busyness level” with his/her value and success, and it’s no wonder people talk/brag/complain about how busy they are all the time

How can we shatter this illusion of busyness? Here are three pointers:  Read more of this post

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Maximizing Your “Return on Time”

 Ready steady... Go  - Day 86 of Project 365

Time is the most precious resource available. It is not renewable, transferable, or savable.  The time you spend reading this blog post isn’t refundable. Following the basic economic principles of supply and demand, since time is such a limited resource, it is extremely valuable.

Just like an investor examines the return on investment for different financial options (stocks, bonds, real estate, startup companies), you and I must evaluate the “return on time” for the activities in our lives. However, there is one big difference between money and time. As one person put it, “Money, I can only gain or lose. But time I can only lose. So, I must spend it carefully.” If we are a good steward of our time, then we will invest it in the activities that we deem to have the highest potential return on time.  That’s where priorities come in.  Read more of this post

Money! Money. Money?

Play the song on YouTube while reading this post.

Money!

A lot of people get excited about money. They will buy lottery cards, fill out surveys, sit in front of slot machines, work extra hard, invent new devices, write business plans, and eat bugs in order to earn some cash. As a recent college graduate, a question that I hear often is “What do you want to do now?” I recently heard another college graduate answer: “I don’t know, but I want to make a lot of money.” So, why all the fuss over money?

Read more of this post

College Reflections: Advice

With the end of my college career approaching, I decided it would be fitting to write a series of posts reflecting on my years in college at John Brown University. The first two posts were about my experiences with School and Church. This final post in the series will contain some advice to those that are currently in college or will beginning that journey soon. Hope you enjoy!

I’d like to wrap up my College Reflections series with some advice that I have learned over the past four years.

  1. Prioritize: One of the hardest things for college students (and people in general) to do is prioritize things. Freshmen show up at JBU and instantly are presented with a plethora of activities, clubs, and friends to connect with and get involved in. As a result, many fill their schedules with 25 hours of activities in a 24-hour day. In order to really get the most out of the four years in college, it is important for each person to get his or her priorities. Of course, school/homework should come first for all students (if you don’t do well in school, you won’t be at school, and won’t be able to do any of the other stuff). Behind that, each person needs to decide what is most important and what they feel like will be the most fulfilling. For me, the list of priorities was school, church, internship at Harvard Avenue Baptist, internship at the Arkansas World Trade Center, JBUltimate club frisbee team, and everything else. Setting priorities makes it much easier to say “no” to certain things, prevents becoming overcommitted, and makes college even more enjoyable.    Read more of this post
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