The Gospel at Work [Book Review]

The average person will spend over 90,000 hours of their life working. 90,000 hours! To put that in perspective, it would basically be like clocking in today and working non-stop for just over 10 years before clocking back out.

Not only does our vocation consume a significant amount of our time, it is also part of our identity. One of the first questions I always get asked when I meet someone new is: “What do you do for a living?” For better or worse, we are associated with the work that we do.

Many people tend to compartmentalize their lives. There’s a Work compartment, Family compartment, Friends compartment, Hobby compartment, and so on. We do our best to keep the different areas from overlapping.

However, for Christians, there is one compartment that should pour over into all the others–or rather be the foundation for everything else: our faith in Jesus Christ. In 1 Corinthians 10:31, Paul writes, “So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” According to this, everything we do throughout a given day should be based on the gospel and done to bring glory to God and not ourselves.

With that in mind, Christians must ask themselves: “How does my faith impact the way I do my job?” To help answer this question, Sebastian Traeger and Greg Gilbert wrote The Gospel at Work: How Working for King Jesus Gives Purpose and Meaning to our Jobs. In this great little book, Traeger and Gilbert address the two main problems that everyone faces when it comes to work and then show how the gospel transforms our purpose and motivation for every aspect of our vocation. They close the book with practical application as it relates to choosing a job, managing people, sharing the gospel, and defining success.  Read more of this post

Work, Ministry, and the Gospel

“If there’s anything in life that we should be passionate about, it’s the gospel.  And I don’t mean passionate only about sharing it with others. I mean passionate about thinking about it, dwelling on it, rejoicing in it, allowing it to color the way we look at the world.  Only one thing can be of first importance to each of us.  And only the gospel ought to be.” -C.J. Mahaney

The False Dicotomy: Work vs Ministry

Too often, I’ve heard a Christian friend or adult say, “I have a normal job and I enjoy it, but ministry always comes second. I just wish I could have a ministry job where I can devote all my time to God and ministry.”

While this sounds spiritual, it leads to three common misconceptions of the relationship between the gospel and our work:  Read more of this post

College Reflections: Church

With the end of my college career approaching, I decided it would be fitting to write a series of posts reflecting on my years in college at John Brown University. During the next few days, I will be reflecting on different aspects of my time in college, namely School, Church, and Work. The final post in the series will contain some advice to those that are currently in college or will beginning that journey soon. Hope you enjoy!

Looking back over the past four years, probably one of the best decisions that I made while at John Brown University was to get involved in a local church. Not only have I made some great memories and met some incredible people, but I have matured a lot in my spiritual life as well. My college experience would have been much different had I not gotten plugged into the local church.

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From Light Bulb to Lamp

 

I have an idea @ home

“Good ideas are common – what’s uncommon are people who’ll work hard enough to bring them about” –Ashleigh Brilliant (English author and cartoonist)

Many times when we think of a great idea, we think of a person with a lightbulb over his or her head (a quick search on Google Images for the word “idea” will confirm this connection). It struck me this afternoon while I was doing laundry that a light bulb is an appropriate symbol for an idea. Now, you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that a light bulb that is not connected to a power source will not stay lit. A light bulb must be screwed into a lamp (or other electrical socket) to be useful for its owner. It will be useless until it is put into a socket that gives it energy and purpose. Once it is screwed in, the light bulb brings light into a once dark or dim place.

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