8 Characteristics of a Godly Decision Maker

Compass

God’s will is something that everybody wants to know. Where will I live when I grow up? Where will I work? Who will I marry? The list goes on and on.

Why do we want to know all of these things anyway? Probably because we want “peace” about a decision or want to have a life free of uncertainty and with minimal risk. While that’s understandable, it’s not necessarily the way God’s will works. As RC Sproul said, “Many Christians become preoccupied or even obsessed with finding the ‘will’ of God for their lives…. Far from being a mark of spirituality, the quest for God’s secret will is an unwarranted invasion of God’s privacy. God’s secret counsel is none of our business.” Too often we spend so much time trying to figure out the parts of God’s will that He doesn’t want us to know yet, that we forget to do the things He has already clearly told us to do. Burk Parsons puts it this way: “So many are looking for special revelation from God while it sits on their shelves gathering dust.”

How should we seek God’s will then? Romans 12:2 gives us a hint: “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.”   Read more of this post

Advertisements

The Need for Critical Thinking

blindfolded ... On Reclaiming "News" (February 28, 2014) ...item 2.. REMAKING THE UNIVERSITY (Wednesday, March 5, 2014) ...item 3.. Tips to spring forward (Mar. 19, 2014) ...

In a world of message overabundance, group-thinking emphasis, and easy social media sharing, is critical thinking slowly becoming less important? Or is it a skill that needs to be reemphasized in classrooms and workplaces?

Definition

Let’s begin by defining the term: critical thinking is “disciplined thinking that is clear, rational, open-minded, and informed by evidence.” Critical thinking has been around as long as human beings have, but began to take shape as a formal process in Ancient Greece with the development of the Socratic method.

It has become an essential part of the education process (especially in higher education) and many professions. Critical thinking involves the five components in the diagram to the right: reasoning, evaluating, problem solving, decision making, and analyzing.

The Trend Away from Critical Thinking?       Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: