The Entrepreneurial Race Part 3: On Your Mark, Get Set, GO!

The Fast and the Furious

This is the third post in the “Entrepreneurial Race” series. Click here to read Part 1: Getting to the TrackPart 2: Picking a Pit Crew, and Part 4: Getting Sponsors.

Gentlemen, start your engines!

When it comes to racing, the start is one of the most important locations on the entire race. Just a few seconds can make the difference between finishing first or last.

The same is true for a new business: the launch is critical. Once a team of founders has explored funding options and assembled a Board of Advisors, they must figure out their launch strategy. Here are some tips for getting a startup off to a good start:  Read more of this post

The Entrepreneurial Race Part 2: Picking a Pit Crew

 

Army Racing pit stop

This is the second post in the “Entrepreneurial Race” series. Click here to read Part 1: Getting to the Track, Part 3: On Your Mark, Get Set, GO!, and Part 4: Getting Sponsors.

Every entrepreneur or aspiring entrepreneur should watch the movie Cars. Not only is it a fun film, it also has a lot of great lessons for founders. In the last post, I discussed different ways to fund a startup and get it from the garage to the race track (several of which Lightning McQueen tried during his trip to the Piston Cup tie-breaker race). This post will focus on another essential part of any business: the mentors, advisors, and directors. These individuals serve as the pit crew for the race car that is your business.  Read more of this post

The Entrepreneurial Race Part 1: Getting to the Track

 

Cobra_28

This is the first post in the “Entrepreneurial Race” series. Click here to read Part 2: Picking a Pit CrewPart 3: On Your Mark, Get Set, GO!, and Part 4: Getting Sponsors.This blog post is adapted from a video lesson I did as a part of middle school entrepreneurship curriculum being put together by the Enactus program at John Brown University. See a teaser of the video here

Start in the Garage

Owning a startup is a lot like owning a race car: you invest a lot of time and energy building the frame, outfitting it with the necessary parts, and deciding what trade offs to make between weight, performance, and cost. Of course, you also take a lot of pride in what you’re building and enjoy telling others about it whenever you can.

Just like any race car, you will never know how well your startup will perform until you get it out onto the track against other businesses. A race car in a garage is useless much like a business that stays in the idea and planning stages indefinitely.  Read more of this post

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