3 Reasons Allstate’s #MayhemSale Stole the Show…Literally

 

 

If you tuned into the Sugar Bowl on New Year’s Day, chances are you also quickly opened your laptop to plunder Matt and Shannon’s house as a part of Allstate’s brilliant #MayhemSale campaign.

Just in case you missed it, here’s an overview: in order to raise awareness for the new Project Aware Share, Allstate staged a faux burglary by their Mayhem character of a real couple’s house (who found out the couple wasn’t home from all their posts on social media). Once inside, Mayhem put a sale price on each item and liquidated them one-by-one on the #MayhemSale website for a fraction of what they were worth.

Allstate’s #MayhemSale was one of the most brilliant marketing efforts in years. Here are three reasons it stole the show…literally:  Read more of this post

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Jesus>Religion [Book Review]

Christianity in America has an image problem.

Unfortunately, when many people hear the word “Christian,” they often envision one of three types of person: 1) an angry legalist who holds signs, burns Qur’ans, and gives you a list of things you can and can’t do to be a “good Christian” [ie the Westboro cult] 2) a person who claims to be a Christian (or wears a cross around their neck) for the benefits, but who’s life is no different than any ordinary person who doesn’t follow Jesus [ie celebrities/artists/athletes] 3) an individual who’s theology is so watered-down that it sounds more like the phrases at the bottom of motivational posters than anything Jesus would say [ie Joel Osteen]. In our culture, it is these so-called “Christians” that get the loudest voice in the media because they are easy to refute/mock (for example, Joel Osteen makes the rounds on the talk and news shows, but you rarely see a true Christian intellectual like Al Mohler). As a result, those that are truly following Jesus must overcome these false perceptions as they seek to fulfill their mission: to make disciples of all nations through the power of the gospel.

Enter Jefferson Bethke. You may remember him from this: The above poem went viral and became a major topic of discussion on social media sites as well as in the blogosphere (including one of my blog posts). When a video goes viral it’s usually for one of three reasons: 1) it’s dumb, ridiculous, and makes us laugh 2) it inspires awe in the viewer 3) it strikes a chord with many in a society. Jefferson’s video falls into that third category. It brought out something that many Americans felt was important and wanted to discuss: Some have been hurt by false moralistic or legalistic religion. Others think the church is broken and beyond repair. Still others genuinely want to pursue Jesus Christ with everything they have.

I’ll admit: I had mixed feelings about the video when it came out. As Kevin DeYoung put it, “There is so much helpful in this poem mixed with so much unhelpful.” However, it is evident that Jefferson has matured a lot since posting the initial video (thanks to the discipleship of Christian leaders and his humility). In order to flesh out his views on Jesus, Christianity, and religion, Jefferson has written the book Jesus>Religion (which launches today). The book uses the contrast between Jesus and religion to accomplish the dual goal of addressing false perceptions of Christianity while presenting a true picture of what followers of Jesus look like.  Read more of this post

Tell Before You Sell

Storytelling

Marketing has come a long way in the past century. Gone are the days of Henry Ford’s “You can have any color [of Ford] as long as it’s black” and the buy, buy, buy mentality (not to be confused with N*SYNC’s “Bye, Bye, Bye“). In today’s marketing, customer relationships are the focus. Companies spend millions of dollars and hundreds of hours each year to build bridges between themselves and their target markets. The emergence of social media has facilitated the creation and maintenance of these relationships.

One of the most powerful tools in this marketing climate is often overlooked. In fact, it is something that is unique to each brand and cannot be copied by any competitors. Utilizing this key unlocks the door to deeper relationships with customers, clients, employees, investors, fans, members, etc.   Read more of this post

Hitting a Hole-in-One with Integrated Marketing Communications

Hole In One

Have you ever played a round of golf on a beautiful day? You tee up your shiny Titleist golf ball, grab your Big Bertha driver, take a few practice swings, and crush the ball several hundred yards down the fairway. Then you hop in your cart, drive down to the ball, pull out your 5 iron and hit the ball again, this time landing it a few yards from the green. Next you grab your pitching wedge and gently pitch the ball up on the green 2 feet from the hole. Triumphantly, you take your putter and finish the hole with a birdie (Tiger Woods fist pump optional).

So what does this have to do with marketing? Quite a bit actually.  Read more of this post

You. The Brand.

Fingerprint

Taco Bell. Jeep. Walmart. Apple. Dell.

What do all of those names have in common? They are all brands (and well-known ones at that). Each of these companies have built a strong and unique brand image through their products, services, advertisements, social media presence, and other communications with the public.

Did you know that you are brand too? Whether you know it or not, the way that you interact with others is similar to how companies express themselves. Your statuses on Facebook, tweets on Twitter, videos on YouTube, and posts on your blog provide potential friends and employers a wealth of information about you, without them ever having to meet you. Once they do meet you, you can refer them to your personal sites so that they can learn more about you and your passions, skills, and abilities.

Read more of this post

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