3 Reasons Allstate’s #MayhemSale Stole the Show…Literally

 

 

If you tuned into the Sugar Bowl on New Year’s Day, chances are you also quickly opened your laptop to plunder Matt and Shannon’s house as a part of Allstate’s brilliant #MayhemSale campaign.

Just in case you missed it, here’s an overview: in order to raise awareness for the new Project Aware Share, Allstate staged a faux burglary by their Mayhem character of a real couple’s house (who found out the couple wasn’t home from all their posts on social media). Once inside, Mayhem put a sale price on each item and liquidated them one-by-one on the #MayhemSale website for a fraction of what they were worth.

Allstate’s #MayhemSale was one of the most brilliant marketing efforts in years. Here are three reasons it stole the show…literally:  Read more of this post

Hitting a Hole-in-One with Integrated Marketing Communications

Hole In One

Have you ever played a round of golf on a beautiful day? You tee up your shiny Titleist golf ball, grab your Big Bertha driver, take a few practice swings, and crush the ball several hundred yards down the fairway. Then you hop in your cart, drive down to the ball, pull out your 5 iron and hit the ball again, this time landing it a few yards from the green. Next you grab your pitching wedge and gently pitch the ball up on the green 2 feet from the hole. Triumphantly, you take your putter and finish the hole with a birdie (Tiger Woods fist pump optional).

So what does this have to do with marketing? Quite a bit actually.  Read more of this post

QR Codes: The Future of Opt-In Marketing

Scanning QR Code Amy Goodman Art

Do you know what a QR code is? If not, you will soon. QR (short for quick-response) codes are two-dimensional barcodes that can be read by QR code readers and certain apps (like WiMo) on smartphones. The code is referred to as “2D” because the scanner reads both horizontally and vertically on the image to decode it. Each square-shaped pattern can be customized to send the person/device scanning it to a website, image, video, or a packet of data. When Matt Martin, Senior Manager-Mobile & Emerging Media at Sam’s Club, came to speak to our Marketing Strategies class at John Brown University, he described QR codes as “hyperlinks on paper.” Anyone can make a QR code: just go to a website like http://delivr.com/qr-code-generator, enter the appropriate information, and wah-lah! you have your own QR code that you can place in your store or on your products, put on your business card, or display anywhere else you want.

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Deciphering our Culture Codes

This past semester, I read a book by Clotaire Rapaille entitled The Culture Code for my Marketing Research class at John Brown University. Though I did not agree with everything that Rapaille said, it was an interesting read, especially as a marketing student. Here are some of my thoughts on the book paraphrased from a paper I wrote for the class:

Every culture has Codes for itself, its members, and its components. In his book The Culture Code, Clotaire Rapaille explores several Codes that are present within American culture. He makes it clear that each Code does not necessarily apply to each member of a culture, but that cultural differences do “actually lead to our processing the same information in different ways” (p. 6). Everyone within a culture often subconsciously uses the different Codes that have been imprinted upon them as a base for making decisions. Since culture changes at a very slow pace (with the exception of very powerful events like September 11, 2001), the Codes of a particular culture remain the same for extended periods of time. This information is useful to marketers that seek to build lasting brand and company images that will resonate with a specific people group for generations.

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