3 Reasons Allstate’s #MayhemSale Stole the Show…Literally

 

 

If you tuned into the Sugar Bowl on New Year’s Day, chances are you also quickly opened your laptop to plunder Matt and Shannon’s house as a part of Allstate’s brilliant #MayhemSale campaign.

Just in case you missed it, here’s an overview: in order to raise awareness for the new Project Aware Share, Allstate staged a faux burglary by their Mayhem character of a real couple’s house (who found out the couple wasn’t home from all their posts on social media). Once inside, Mayhem put a sale price on each item and liquidated them one-by-one on the #MayhemSale website for a fraction of what they were worth.

Allstate’s #MayhemSale was one of the most brilliant marketing efforts in years. Here are three reasons it stole the show…literally:  Read more of this post

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How to Develop a Personal Mission Statement

 

Arrow

Mission statements. Every company has one. Some are really good; some are really bad. Regardless of the quality of a mission statement, they all have the same purpose: to give direction to the daily actions of an organization.

Organizations aren’t the only entities that need mission statements to guide them. You and I need mission statements as well, especially as you think about building your personal brand. Having a personal mission statement is important for three reasons:

  1. It differentiates you from others
    One of the things I’ve learned as an entrepreneur is that investors invest in people more so than products. For example, they would rather invest in an entrepreneur trying to create positive social change by selling widgets than an entrepreneur trying to get famous and make a lot of money selling the same widget. Having a personal mission statement helps potential investors, employers, friends, etc know your underlying motivations and what sets you apart from others.
  2. It gives direction to your career path
    Knowing what your true mission is will help you select jobs that will allow you to accomplish your goals, even if on paper they seem unrelated. I currently am involved in the agricultural technology, young adult ministry, experiential education, and social media arenas, but I am still able to fulfill my mission in these seemingly random combination of jobs.
  3. It reminds you why you do what you do when things get tough
    Your job isn’t always easy. There are some days you’ll want to quit or disengage. Having a purpose behind your work keeps you focused and moving forward even during the hard times. Your mission is a motivator pushing you toward a greater purpose than earning a paycheck.

Steven Covey refers to developing a mission statement as “connecting with your own unique purpose and the profound satisfaction that comes from fulfilling it.” Here are five questions to ask yourself in order to develop your personal mission statement:  Read more of this post

Customer Service: Turning “My Duty” Into “My Pleasure”

Chick-fil-A, Spotsylvania Mall Drive, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, VA

“My pleasure!”

Though it always makes me chuckle a little bit, I never tire of hearing a Chick-fil-A employee saying that to each customer who says “Thank you.” Those two words reveal a novel concept that should be at the core of any business: that employees view serving customers as a pleasure and not a duty.  Read more of this post

Give Your Marketing Wings: Lessons in Marketing from Red Bull

Building a brand is a tough job. It requires hours of careful thought in order to consistently execute products, services, advertisements, etc that are “on brand.” Some companies go their whole lives without getting it right, others are “one hit wonders,” and a select few make it look easy.

Red Bull is one of the select companies to consistently make branding look easy. During the past few years, they have had campaigns featuring wingsuits, Rube Goldberg machines, and space jumps. In addition, the company sponsors many athletes and teams participating in both traditional and extreme sports (full list of sponsorships) as well as events such as the Red Bull Air Race and the Red Bull Flugtag. They even have their own record labelRead more of this post

Tell Before You Sell

Storytelling

Marketing has come a long way in the past century. Gone are the days of Henry Ford’s “You can have any color [of Ford] as long as it’s black” and the buy, buy, buy mentality (not to be confused with N*SYNC’s “Bye, Bye, Bye“). In today’s marketing, customer relationships are the focus. Companies spend millions of dollars and hundreds of hours each year to build bridges between themselves and their target markets. The emergence of social media has facilitated the creation and maintenance of these relationships.

One of the most powerful tools in this marketing climate is often overlooked. In fact, it is something that is unique to each brand and cannot be copied by any competitors. Utilizing this key unlocks the door to deeper relationships with customers, clients, employees, investors, fans, members, etc.   Read more of this post

Hitting a Hole-in-One with Integrated Marketing Communications

Hole In One

Have you ever played a round of golf on a beautiful day? You tee up your shiny Titleist golf ball, grab your Big Bertha driver, take a few practice swings, and crush the ball several hundred yards down the fairway. Then you hop in your cart, drive down to the ball, pull out your 5 iron and hit the ball again, this time landing it a few yards from the green. Next you grab your pitching wedge and gently pitch the ball up on the green 2 feet from the hole. Triumphantly, you take your putter and finish the hole with a birdie (Tiger Woods fist pump optional).

So what does this have to do with marketing? Quite a bit actually.  Read more of this post

Arby’s: Changing the Mood of Fast Food

When I think of fast food, the last thing that I usually connect with it is a personal experience. Usually I feel like a herded animal: after waiting in line for what seems like years, I am “greeted” by a grouchy employee who takes my order as fast as he can, gives me my number and shoos me off in order to “help” the next person in line. This seems to be pretty consistent no matter what fast food chain I visit (with the exception of Chick-fil-A of course).

You can imagine my surprise one day a few months ago when I got to the front of the line at Arby’s and was greeted by an employee who was more polite than usual. After placing my order, I was asked the following question that caught my attention:  Read more of this post

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