My Top 5 Books of 2018

books2018

2018 is almost over, which means it’s time for the annual round up of the best books I read during the past twelve months:

  1. The Ten Commandments by Thomas Watson
    Think you know the 10 Commandments? Thomas Watson’s commentary on the 10 Commandments (part of his Body of Practical Divinity trilogy) will take you much deeper into each of the commandments. Following Jesus’ example in the gospels, Watson applies each command not just to outward action but to an internal reality–the state of a person’s heart (see Matthew 5, Mark 10, and Luke 18). Watson skillfully expounds on the breadth and depth of the 10 Commandments’ role in the Christian’s life, giving both a framework for holiness and instruction for obedience. While emphasizing the importance of the Law, he does not do so at the expense of the mercy and grace found through faith in Christ. Watson’s The Ten Commandments is a needed reminder for those who have grown up hearing, but not meditating on, the Commandments their whole life. Thou shalt read this book.

    “Love is an industrious affection; it sets the head studying for God, the hands working, feet running in the ways of his commandments.” -Thomas Watson

  2. Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of NIKE by Phil Knight
    In Shoe Dog, Phil Knight tells the story of NIKE’s conception through it’s IPO.  This book isn’t your typical autobiography as it focuses more on the people surrounding Knight and his philosophy of business than it does on the author himself. The story of NIKE is one of determination in the face of challenging circumstances and the isolation of many people doubting the viability of the venture. It is a testament to just how far innovation, passion, and commitment (or some would say stubbornness) can go in bringing an idea to life. Knight not only gives insight into his management philosophy, but is also transparent about the toll it took on his personal life–in particular his relationship with his sons. Shoe Dog is a fast-paced and enjoyable read, even for those who don’t typically enjoy biographies. The book definitely lives up to the hype that has surrounded it since it came out. Go pick up a copy and read it–Just do it.

    “Don’t tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and let them surprise you with their results.” -Phil Knight

  3. Conscience: What It Is, How to Train It, and Loving Those Who Differ by Andrew David Naselli and J.D. Crowley
    When was the last time you spent time you heard a sermon or lesson on the conscience? If you answered “when I watched Pinocchio”, then you should pick up Conscience by Naselli and Crowley. In this book, the authors purpose is to explain what the conscience is and persuade you that it is something you should be paying more attention to, especially if you are a Christian. Nasellli and Crowley emphasize that, while the conscience is not on par with Scripture or the conviction of the Holy Spirit, it is still a God-given gift to every human being. The conscience isn’t static, but can be trained–either actively or passively–to hopefully be more aligned with God’s will, but can also be seared towards certain actions through repeated violation of the conscience’s “warning system.” In addition, since each person’s conscience is unique, the authors encourage readers to not intentionally lead someone to violate their conscience (no matter how ridiculous we may think their view is), but to rather patiently help them align their views with those found in Scripture so that they might experience the fullness of the gifts that God has given us to enjoy. Conscience draws upon multiple biblical passages in addition to the authors’ experiences in a variety of US and international contexts to make a strong case for paying more attention to the state of your conscience while providing practical tips for how that works itself in your daily life and relationships with others.

    “Because God is the Lord of your conscience, he expects you as a mature believer to gradually adjust your conscience to match God’s will as Scripture reveals it. To train and educate your conscience is not to sin against it but to put it under the lordship of Christ.” -Naselli and Crowley

  4. Grace: God’s Unmerited Favor by C.H. Spurgeon
    What makes salvation possible? In this short book, C.H. Spurgeon highlights the primacy of God’s grace in making salvation possible and in continuing to sustain His people until the end. Grace is a series of easy-to-understand expositions of key passages in which the author shows that God’s grace is the cornerstone of Christianity. The book will create an even greater appreciation and thankfulness for the lengths that God has gone to in order to redeem people from the snares of their sinfulness. Spurgeon concludes the book with twelve mercies for those whom God has made a covenant with:

    1. Saving knowledge
    2. God’s law written in men’s hearts
    3. Free pardon
    4. Reconciliation
    5. True godliness
    6. Continuance in grace
    7. Cleansing
    8. Renewed nature
    9. Holy conduct
    10. Happy self-loathing
    11. Communion w/ God
    12. Necessary chastisement

      “God observes us, all lost and ruined, and in his infinite mercy comes with absolute promises of grace to those whom he has given to his Son Jesus.” -C.H. Spurgeon

  5. Sales Enablement: A Master Framework to Build, Coach, and Lead Your Most Productive Sales Team by Byron Matthews and Tamara Schenk
    “Sales enablement” is a relatively new term in the business world. It is a discipline that stands at the intersection of sales, marketing, operations, strategy, and communications. As with most new disciplines, there is a level of ambiguity as to what it actually is, which is where Matthews and Schenk’s book comes in. Their book is designed to not only define the term, but outline what it should look like within a company. Sales Enablement uses both objective and subjective data that Miller Heiman Group has collected from organizations of various sizes and compiles it into an actionable framework for businesspeople. The book puts a lot of emphasis on beginning the implementation of a sales enablement discipline with a charter and a plan, recognizing that businesses of various sizes will have different capacities for different sized teams with varying access to resources. While some of the examples tend to favor larger organizations, this is still a very practical read for people in small and medium sized businesses as well, especially if you are doing high-value B2B sales.

    “Sales force enablement is a strategic, cross-functional discipline, designed to increase sales results and productivity by providing integrated content, training and coaching services for salespeople and sales managers along the entire customer’s journey, powered by technology.” -Matthews and Schenk

 

Honorable Mentions:

For an overview of all the books I’ve read this year, click here.

Reading is an invaluable discipline that will help to make you a more well-rounded person in addition to deepening your knowledge. For those that enjoy reading, I recommend setting up a Goodreads profile (it’s also a great way to keep track of what’s in your library). If you’d like to keep up with what I’m reading now and what I’ve read in the past, check out my Goodreads profile. Happy reading!

Have you read any of these books or do have a book that would recommend reading in 2019? Share your recommendations in the Comments below.

-Lawson
Learn It. Love It. Live It.

BONUS:  My Top 5 Books of 2017 || My Top 5 Books of 2016 || My Top 5 Books of 2015 || My Top 5 Books of 2014 || My Top 5 Books of 2013

About Lawson Hembree
Serving others by building brands. Disciple || Marketer || Entrepreneur || Meatatarian Want to continue the discussion or write a guest post? Let's Connect!

3 Responses to My Top 5 Books of 2018

  1. Pat Alcorn says:

    I did listen to Shoe Dog, which was very interesting.

  2. Dad says:

    Thank you for sharing!

  3. Pingback: My Top 5 Books of 2019 | Lawson Hembree's Blog

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