Entrepreneurship Isn’t Sexy

At work

What comes to mind when you think of entrepreneurship?

The image that many have of the startup world is a bunch of 20-somethings pitching their businesses in hoodies and jeans, playing ping-pong, working flexible hours, drinking lots of beer and Red Bull, and closing million or billion dollar acquisition deals. Entrepreneurship is seen as trendy, sexy, and a fun and easy way to make a lot of money, especially among my Millennial counterparts (60% of whom consider themselves entrepreneurs). People currently employed at other companies view entrepreneurship as the gateway to freedom and prosperity. Universities, cities, and entire states view startups as their economic saviors and as a result bend over backwards to cater to and attract them. This is the picture that has been painted of entrepreneurship.  Read more of this post

How to Harness the Power of Social Media to Land Your Next Job [Guest Post]

 

Social Media apps

[Guest post courtesy of Erin Horton of Resume.com. Scroll to the bottom to learn more about Erin and Resume.com.]

Looking for a new job can be difficult. Not only can it be a lot of work; it can also be stressful. Using social media can make the job search easier. Facebook, Twitter, and other forms of social media have transformed the way that people find a new job. LinkedIn can be particularly useful because of its focus on professional networking. Using LinkedIn can help make professional connections that can help improve your career. Before you start using social media to help you find a job, there are a few things you need to know. Here are a few tips to help you make the most of social media to land your next job:  Read more of this post

Jesus>Religion [Book Review]

Christianity in America has an image problem.

Unfortunately, when many people hear the word “Christian,” they often envision one of three types of person: 1) an angry legalist who holds signs, burns Qur’ans, and gives you a list of things you can and can’t do to be a “good Christian” [ie the Westboro cult] 2) a person who claims to be a Christian (or wears a cross around their neck) for the benefits, but who’s life is no different than any ordinary person who doesn’t follow Jesus [ie celebrities/artists/athletes] 3) an individual who’s theology is so watered-down that it sounds more like the phrases at the bottom of motivational posters than anything Jesus would say [ie Joel Osteen]. In our culture, it is these so-called “Christians” that get the loudest voice in the media because they are easy to refute/mock (for example, Joel Osteen makes the rounds on the talk and news shows, but you rarely see a true Christian intellectual like Al Mohler). As a result, those that are truly following Jesus must overcome these false perceptions as they seek to fulfill their mission: to make disciples of all nations through the power of the gospel.

Enter Jefferson Bethke. You may remember him from this: The above poem went viral and became a major topic of discussion on social media sites as well as in the blogosphere (including one of my blog posts). When a video goes viral it’s usually for one of three reasons: 1) it’s dumb, ridiculous, and makes us laugh 2) it inspires awe in the viewer 3) it strikes a chord with many in a society. Jefferson’s video falls into that third category. It brought out something that many Americans felt was important and wanted to discuss: Some have been hurt by false moralistic or legalistic religion. Others think the church is broken and beyond repair. Still others genuinely want to pursue Jesus Christ with everything they have.

I’ll admit: I had mixed feelings about the video when it came out. As Kevin DeYoung put it, “There is so much helpful in this poem mixed with so much unhelpful.” However, it is evident that Jefferson has matured a lot since posting the initial video (thanks to the discipleship of Christian leaders and his humility). In order to flesh out his views on Jesus, Christianity, and religion, Jefferson has written the book Jesus>Religion (which launches today). The book uses the contrast between Jesus and religion to accomplish the dual goal of addressing false perceptions of Christianity while presenting a true picture of what followers of Jesus look like.  Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: