Deciphering our Culture Codes

This past semester, I read a book by Clotaire Rapaille entitled The Culture Code for my Marketing Research class at John Brown University. Though I did not agree with everything that Rapaille said, it was an interesting read, especially as a marketing student. Here are some of my thoughts on the book paraphrased from a paper I wrote for the class:

Every culture has Codes for itself, its members, and its components. In his book The Culture Code, Clotaire Rapaille explores several Codes that are present within American culture. He makes it clear that each Code does not necessarily apply to each member of a culture, but that cultural differences do “actually lead to our processing the same information in different ways” (p. 6). Everyone within a culture often subconsciously uses the different Codes that have been imprinted upon them as a base for making decisions. Since culture changes at a very slow pace (with the exception of very powerful events like September 11, 2001), the Codes of a particular culture remain the same for extended periods of time. This information is useful to marketers that seek to build lasting brand and company images that will resonate with a specific people group for generations.

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Doing Virtuous Business

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to attend a screening of the PBS documentary “Doing Virtuous Business” at the new Berry Performing Arts Center on the campus of John Brown University. The documentary is based on Dr. Theodore Malloch‘s best-seller Spiritual Enterprise and takes a look at fourteen traits that translate into success for modern corporations, even during tense economic times.

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